How to Get a National Park Camp Host Job

The National Park camp host is a welcome sight after a long journey. That friendly nod and recognizable ranger-esque uniform instantly brings a sense of comfort and familiarity in unfamiliar, wild places. As a full-time RVer, I’ve often wondered how to get a national park camp host job. While visiting Nevada’s Great Basin National Park, a friendly park ranger explained how.
What Do Workampers Do?
A National Park Camp Host in Big Bend, Texas. Image: LiveWorkDream.com
Workamping is one way of lowing your travel costs when RVing across the country. A typical workamping position consists of an arrangement between an employer (or organization like the National Park Service) and an RVer with a self-contained rig.
The workamper will put in a pre-determined number of hours each week at the employer’s establishment. In return, he or she receives free or discounted RV parking. Sometimes an hourly wage is paid for every hour worked, but not always. The workamper may also receive non-monetary compensation, like free propane and use of guest facilities. The workamping risks and rewards are many, and vary from job to job.
Call me biased, but I believe that life as a camp host is a far more rewarding experience than working in a private RV park. Each day these volunteer heroes take some of the pressure off park rangers. From their temporary home in a beautiful national park campground, camp hosts tackle daily duties such as:

Directing road-weary guests to open campsites
Educating visitors about their environment
Sharing tips for local attractions
Tidying up campsites
Cleaning facilities

Here’s a more detailed camp host job description from Volunteer.gov, the clearinghouse for public lands volunteer opportunities:
Typical camp host duties at National Parks in the U.S.
A National Park camp host job isn’t always perfect, however. While private RV parks will almost always provide full-hookups for the workamper, a national park camp host campsite

Read original article at RV Life.

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