This Lightweight Camping Trailer Tows with Almost Anything

Are you one of the millions of Americans thinking about RVing this summer? If so, here’s a little lightweight camping trailer that’s ideal for anyone who wants to try this awesome lifestyle without the expense of buying a heavier tow vehicle: The Little Giant Camping Trailer. Made by Let’s Go Aero, it’s a double-duty work-and-play setup.
Tow this with nearly any vehicle that has a tow hitch.
A Big Trailer for Small Cars
Big trailers precariously pulled by little cars are a regular sight on the highway. These owners obliviously drive overloaded SUVs and light trucks down the road, unaware of the dangers of exceeding the Gross Vehicle Weight Ratio of their automobile. These are accidents waiting to happen, that could be avoided with an appropriately sized lightweight camping trailer. The adorable mini-RV is a perfect example.
For outdoor adventurers who want to own a lightweight camping trailer, but don’t have the right tow vehicle to pull one, The Little Giant Camping Trailer is an ideal choice. This ultra-light, all-in-one cargo, utility, and camping RV can be pulled by nearly any vehicle with a trailer hitch. Made by Colorado manufacturer Let’s Go Aero, it’s basically a pick-up truck bed on wheels that converts to a camping tent.
It’s a 3/4 ton truck bed that does double duty.
The ¾ ton truck bed body features a tough, weather-resistant shell, torsion axles, steel fenders and full LED lighting. It looks heavy, but with a payload capacity of 1500 pounds, a tongue weight of 30 pounds and a GVWR of 1920 pounds, this little RV is ideal for anyone who wants to try RVing without the expense of buying a heavier tow vehicle. The Tow Rating is a “1�, which means small cars can pull it on paved or unpaved roads.
Use it for everyday cargo hauling, then take it out

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Fountain of Youth Trail Running Fun

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A Look at Camping and the Effects of COVID-19

We’re all itching to get on the road again, and a new KOA report, Camping and the Effects of COVID-19, shows how and when North America’s outdoorsy lifestyle will resume.
Study Examines Camping and the Effects of COVID-19
Download the KOA Study to learn more.
Camping is going to be more popular than ever if survey results from a special edition of the annual KOA North American Camping are correct. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the travel landscape as we know it.
Domestic camping will be the first to see how these changes play out. For example, before the pandemic, only 11% of leisure travel trips were camping adventures. That number is expected to grow to 16% by the end of the year, according to 4500 North American campers surveyed in the U.S. and Canada.
The KOA special report survey was conducted between April 27-30, 2020. KOA conducted it to get a feel for North American leisure travelers’ current perspectives on camping. According to KOA, “This new research shows the camping industry may rebound sooner than other forms of travel, and may even gain strength later in the year, due to its consideration as a safe way to resume travel among COVID-19 health precautions.”
What will camping look like during COVID-19?
Graphic: The COVID-19 edition of the North American Camping Report by Kampgrounds of America.
The KOA report revealed key findings about RVing and tenters’ travel plans for the coming season. This is what their responses revealed:
COVID-19 isn’t stopping experienced campers. Half of survey respondents say they believe camping is still the safest way to travel, once restrictions are lifted.

Nearly 41% still plan on going camping this year.
About 54% will do it within the next two months.

 
Camping has got the attention of people who have never considered it before. One third of leisure travelers say they are now

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True Tales of Pandemic RV Parenting

Full-timing with kids is more popular than ever. For many of these families on the road in the age of Coronavirus, pandemic RV parenting is still better than living a traditional life. This is what Two Moms and a Trailer have to say about it while on the road with their two boys and two dogs.
One Family’s Story of Pandemic RV Parenting
Shay, Damien, Oliver and America are 2 Moms and a Trailer
Full-time RVing with kids isn’t as weird as it used to be. With more parents than ever who can work remotely online, young couples are traveling by RV while raising kids and pets along the way. Shay and America are one such couple from California. 
Currently traveling with Damien (age 9), Oliver (age 3), and their two dogs Emma and Penny, the duo has traveled coast-to-coast since hitting the road three years ago. They decided to do it when they realized that the rat race was running them into the ground.
The family has been on the road three years.
“For us the inspiration to begin RVing really came from life kicking us to the curb,” explains Shay. “We worked all the time …and had nothing but piles of bills, a house full of junk, zero time, stress, and debt to show for it. Everything came to a head and we had to make a choice; go under or rise up and make a change. We took a chance and chose change. We sold everything… house included and hit the road. All while pregnant with our second baby might I add! We moved into the trailer when Oliver was 2 weeks old.”
Damien and Oliver are adaptable and ready to roll.
Full-timing was the best decision they ever made, but they don’t do it without careful planning and saving. America and Shay discovered that

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In the Age of Coronavirus, Harvest Hosts is a Must Have RV Club Membership

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The Conundrum of Coronavirus RV Travel for Full-timers

RVs are self-contained homes on wheels that take us any place we want. But just because we can, should we? The conundrum of Coronavirus RV travel is weighing heavy on the minds of all RVers, but especially full-timers like me. Hitting the road brings on a whole new set of pandemic concerns.
Thinking Before Turning the Key
 
Today, there’s more to think about before hitting the road.
That old song by the Clash keeps playing in my head. “Should I Stay or Should I Go?” The RVer’s mantra of “If you don’t like the neighborhood, then turn the key and leave,” now gives us reason to pause and consider the ramifications of doing so.
Many RVers aren’t waiting for the Pandemic all-clear and hitting the road now.  The wisest ones are trying to steer clear of interacting with people along the way. I’ve considered doing the same, but then I got to thinking about the What Ifs. Even if I don’t think my husband and I will interact with other campers, it’s always possible we would need to. The usual road trip necessities take on entirely new considerations:

Filling up at fueling stations means touching gas pumps, pin pads and sometimes interacting with cashiers.
Since many parks aren’t yet accepting guests, I worry about encountering too many people in the few dispersed camping areas that are open.
When we need to dump, we’ll need to visit a dump station, touched by the hands of many other campers. Wearing gloves can protect us, but they’re not foolproof
And finally, when we run out of food, we will need to go into a local grocery stores and interact with locals.

My husband and I are fortunate in that we are sheltering in place in a beautiful location on private property. Our friends invited us to stay indefinitely, but some days the

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Has Coronavirus Changed RV Park Life?

Many RVers like me prefer wide open spaces and boondocking over full-hookups and paved parking spaces. But in a pandemic, guess where most of us headed? You guessed it, RV parks. And when we arrived, one thing was clear: coronavirus has changed RV park life, at least somewhat, depending on where you landed. This is what living in RV parks looks like right now, according to RVers from coast-to-coast.
Nomads Share Coronavirus Experiences
Are you sheltering in place at an RV park? Image: liveworkdream.com
I love dry camping on public lands, but I don’t mind heading to RV parks when the weather is too hot or too cold. Or when a pandemic strikes. After COVID-19 arrived in the U.S., the logic of sheltering in place at a commercial campground could not be argued. After all, even the most hearty boondockers must vacate their campsite occasionally for dump runs and provisions. It’s a relatively simple boondocking chore, but in a time of Coronavirus, repeated exposure to public facilities can be deadly.
When friends of ours generously offered a parking spot with full-hookups, we jumped at the chance. But most full-time RVers haven’t been as fortunate. For nomads around the country, full hookups are saving lives. Since many municipalities chose to keep RV parks open, these essential businesses really are the best option to stay safe and ride out the health crisis of the century.
Lately I’ve been thinking about how Coronavirus changed RV park life, so I turned to the helpful Xscapers community, a branch of the Escapees RV Club. What I specifically wanted to know was: what does it look like inside the parks? Are the guests handling COVID-19 hygiene recommendations any better than non-RVers? Close to 100 people responded with fascinating stories about RVing during COVID-19.
Is RV park management doing a good job with

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Two RVers Running to the Next Race Milestone

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The Nitty Gritty of Workamping During Coronavirus

When the Coronavirus pandemic hit the United States, the joy and adventure of full-time RVing quickly exploded into non-stop panic for many of us. But one group of full-timers was sitting pretty when shelter-in-place restrictions went down. For the many workampers in America’s privately-owned RV parks, workamping during Coronavirus was the best situation any full-time RVer could imagine.
The Pandemic that Stopped RVers In Our Tracks
The Albuquerque interstate ghost town. Image: @rvswat
If anyone would have told me that after thirteen years on the road, a pandemic would stop my husband and I in our tracks, I wouldn’t have believed them. But Coronavirus affected RVers like nobody ever imagined. Nomads like myself scrambled to secure a long-term parking spot as RV park spaces disappeared overnight. Public lands boondocking wasn’t an option either. Access grew difficult because government entities closed off entire swaths of land.
Many full-timers like me were left with few options. Rumors of scattershot overnight camping spots floated around social media. For many of us, big box store parking lots or staying with friends, families and sometimes generous strangers were our only option. If only we were workamping.
The New Benefits of Workamping During a Pandemic
If you’re not familiar with workamping, you should be. It’s a popular way for many full-time RVers to reduce living expenses. The arrangement is between full-time RVers and business owners who need help with everything from RV park labor to farming. The RVer works a pre-determined number of hours each week. In exchange they get lowered rent, and sometimes wages with bonuses like free laundry.
All workamping jobs have pros and cons. But nobody ever thought one of the pros would be “a safe place to stay during a pandemic� But apparently it is, and group of workampers around the United States proves it. They recently demonstrated that

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Nancy’s Full-time RVing Legacy

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