RV Loans Video Explains How Financing Works

Can you finance a Prevost without an RV loan? Some people can! Image: LWBAZ, iRV2 Forums member
RV Loans Video Explains How Financing Works
Are you looking for your first RV loan? I know what that feels like. RV financing feels so confusing, but this new video by Camping World explains the process in simple language anyone can understand.

How to get the best RV loan for your needs
If you are in the market for a new RV, and you know you’ll need help paying for it, here is quick and dirty look at the ins and outs of RV financing. 
The RV lending process is similar to buying a new stick house, but with less paperwork and easier repayment terms. For example:
Many loans start at about $5,000. Some go up well over $100,000.
Down payments are helpful. Lenders like it when borrowers have at least 20% of the total cost to put toward the RV. Occasionally they will only require 10% down.
RV financing terms vary from four years to twenty.
Most are within 10 to 15 years. The higher the RV cost, the more options you will have to finance your rig.
Two types of RV loans exist: secured and unsecured.
With a secured loan, the RV gets repossessed if you don’t pay your loan. But the benefits enable you to deduct RV loan interest from your federal taxes. Unsecured RV loans don’t hold your RV as collateral, but the rate will be much higher.
Getting financed is as easy as walking into your nearest RV dealership.
You may be tempted to get a loan through somewhere like Costco or a credit union, but RV dealership finance departments have connections with lenders with better terms. Their goal is to make it easy for you to get a new home on wheels.
Your credit score and down payment determines your RV loan

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Covid Recovery and the Full-Time RVing Life

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3 Dangers Of RVing With Dogs That Are Totally Preventable

RVing with intelligent dogs like Wyatt means taking extra precautions. Image: LiveWorkDream.com
3 Dangers Of RVing With Dogs That Are Totally Preventable
Many of us can’t imagine life on the road without our canine co-pilots. For their safety, we must be aware of important dangers of RVing with dogs.
Dogs enhance our experiences in nature. They force us to take time and smell the flowers, to sit and savor the scenery and explore our surroundings when the time is right. But for all the joys of RVing with dogs, certain dangers lurk in this lifestyle that don’t exist in the real world.
At best, these pet hazards can cost you a lot of money at the vet clinic. At worst, your pet’s life may be at risk. If you think of yourself as a responsible pet parent, you’ll want to avoid these common RVing dog dangers.
1. Don’t let your pooch drive the RV. 
As parent to a high strung, intelligent German Shepherd who recently passed, I always worried that one day he would take his role as co-pilot a little too seriously. That’s why anytime we park our Dodge RAM, we put on the emergency break to ensure he doesn’t attempt a getaway.
After all, thousands of children have been known to accidentally hit a gearshift and send the vehicle into motion. Knowing my dog is as smart as the average two-year-old human, it makes sense that he’s capable of doing the same.
Setting the emergency brake seems like the common sense thing to do whether you’re driving a passenger car or RVing with children or pets. But I also know that after a long day’s drive, even little pet safety tasks like this are easily forgotten. And that’s exactly what happened to this poor guy in Texas:

Whatever kind of RV you drive, make it a habit

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A Craptastic Covid Christmas

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10 Hard Truths About RV Parks (And What To Do About Them)

Trees can be a curse and a blessing. (Image: @lunarlight, iRV2 Forums)
10 Hard Truths About RV Parks (And What To Do About Them)
Experienced RVers know that not all RV parks are created equal. These ten truths about RV parks can prepare you for the unexpected and sometimes disappointing surprises of finding a place to park your home on wheels.
One of the best things about RV living is that it’s always an adventure when you turn the key and head onto the open road. But sometimes this lifestyle throws curveballs at you, especially when it comes to the range of quality among privately-owned parks. You can make the most of the adventurous life by preparing for these uncomfortable truths about some locations.
1. Sewer hookups aren’t always easy to access.
Sometimes you have to wonder what RV park architects are thinking when they decide on utility hookup locations. Many RV park sewer drain locations are in awkward locations on a campsite.
In a perfect world, RV park sewer drain locations should accommodate all size rigs, and multiple sewer drain locations would be a dream come true. Carrying an extra sewer hose comes in handy when your RV dump valve is too far from the sewer hookup.
2. You might get to know the neighbors really well.
Everyone has different ideas about the ideal RV campsite size. Many privately-owned RV parks maximize every square foot of space by packing it full of campsites. This can make for an uncomfortable time when you walk out your front door and right into your neighbor’s steps. In our pandemic era when social distancing could save your life, it’s wise to carefully check campground reviews and customer experiences before deciding on a place to stay.
3. Size matters when it comes to RV park sites.
Too many RV park layouts assume that one-size

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Pros & Cons Of Full-Time RVing In A Fifth Wheel

Our Northwood Arctic Fox fifth wheel and Dodge RAM 2500 truck. (Image: LiveWorkDream.com)
Pros & Cons Of Full-Time RVing In A Fifth Wheel
All RVers have their own opinion about the best kind of RV for full-time RVing. As a towable owner, I’ve discovered that full-time RVing in a fifth wheel has pros and cons of its own. Yet after fourteen years of traveling, living, and working in a fifth wheel, I’m still in love with this RV type. Here’s why.
Pros of full-time RVing in a fifth wheel
As you’ll see below, I have a hard time coming up with the cons of full-time RVing in a fifth wheel. But when it comes to the pros, my list is long. After owning two fifth wheels by the same manufacturer, here’s what I love the most about full-time RVing in a fifth wheel.
Towable RVs cost less to own.
With only one vehicle engine to maintain, the cost of full-time RVing in a fifth wheel is lower than motorized RVs. The cost of ownership for our Dodge RAM 2500 that pulls our Arctic Fox fifth wheel is in line with NADA Guides and far exceeds trailer maintenance costs. But those costs still can’t compare to the much higher expense of full-time RVing in a motorhome and tow vehicle. Our fifth wheel trailer insurance and registration also costs less than a motorized RV policy.
If your engine needs work, your home stays in the RV park.
When you live on the road, a vehicle repair can upend your plans and generate unwanted stress. But on those rare occasions when our Dodge RAM needs to visit a diesel repair shop, we are grateful that our home can stay put. Sure, there’s the hassle of getting to and from the shop without a second vehicle, but we always find a way

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Get Full-time RVing Training, the Right Way

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Winter RVing Tips From Experienced Snowbirds

Cold weather camping can be fun! (Image: @buskipper, iRV2 Forums)
Winter RVing Tips From Experienced Snowbirds
Some RV snowbirds flock to snow, not away from it. In these winter RVing tips, these experts show that RVing in cold temperatures is an art that anyone can master. Here’s how.
You don’t need an expensive RV with heated basements, or a lot of money to tackle a cold-weather RV camping experience. All you need to make it through winter is a willingness to learn the capabilities and limitations of your own RV before getting caught in freezing weather.
You’ll need to understand your RV systems, experiment with different types of cold weather insulation, and talk with others who’ve been there, done that. To get you started, these experienced winter RVers offer their best winter camping tips to keep you and your RV safe when temperatures drop. 
Use a heated RV water hose
Water hoses freeze fast without extra precautions. In this iRV2 Winter Camping Thread, senior forums member @FatChance shares ten critical winter camping tips. Based on his experience in his 2004 Newmar Mountain Aire 4016, 400ISL, he recommends (among many other great tips) using a heated water hose, heat tape, and a “Thermocube” Outlet:
A Camco “Freeze Ban” heated water hose and heat tape on the metal pipe on the fresh water spigot. I power them off the power pedestal using a Thermocube outlet (turns on when it gets down to 35* and off when it gets up to 45*). I also put an orange Home Depot bucket over the spigot to keep the electrics dry and to hold in a little heat over the spigot. So far, this has worked to keep the water flowing even when it gets down into the teens. In single digits, I turn off the water as a precaution and use the water

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A Waterfall of Blessings (in a Shitstorm of a Year)

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2 Big RV Mistakes You Might Be Making

This mistake can cost you your life! (Image: LiveWorkDream.com)
2 Big RV Mistakes You Might Be Making
It doesn’t matter if you bought your RV to join the thousands of new full-time RV nomads who hit the road this year. Or, if you just want to be a weekend camping warrior. These two big RV rookie mistakes are made by nearly all RVers. Here are the two dumbest RVing errors we made that could have cost us our lives.
RV mistake #1: RVing without roadside assistance.
We bought our first fifth wheel in 2008. Our goal was to enjoy a one-year road trip with our dog who had terminal cancer. But the adventure became a journey with no ending. Although our dog passed on, we are still traveling thirteen years later, and have no plans to quit. Looking back, I cannot believe that we spent our first few years on the road without a roadside assistance plan. Don’t ask me why, I can’t even tell you.
But someone was looking out for us, because nothing terrible happened on our travels during that time. Then one day after a friend’s RV roadside calamity, we woke up to the fact that we were pushing our luck. We enrolled in a popular RV roadside assistance plan and guess what? About six months later, that small annual RV expense paid for itself.
Roadside assistance can save your life—and your RV
We had our first RV tire blowout on Highway 50, the Loneliest Highway in Nevada. Thankfully we had cellular service and could reach out for help, which arrived in less than one hour. A second blowout happened a few years later on Interstate 25. The RV roadside assistance driver came to our rescue, instead of forcing my husband to put his life on the line to change a tire on the

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