How to Find Private Lake Tahoe Campsites for RVs

California’s Sierra Nevada mountains offer some of the best camping in the nation. But these days, it seems every RVer knows it. Finding secluded, private Lake Tahoe campsites for RVs can be challenging, but not if you pack a copy of Lake Tahoe Camping with Privacy by Kimberly and Patrick Wilkes.
If you love privacy, you need this campsite directory.
Hot off the press and ready to show you the road to a secluded getaway, Lake Tahoe Camping with Privacy is an exceptional directory for any RVer headed to the Sierras. The Wilkes’ sent us a press copy of their latest must-have directory for RVers seeking private Lake Tahoe campsites.
RV-friendly site #139, Logger Campground at Stampede Reservoir.
If you love camping in the Golden State or plan on doing some, here’s why it’s a must-have addition to your RVing library.
A Unique Look at Private Lake Tahoe Campsites for RVs
The end of first-come-first-served campsites is happening throughout the U.S. This forces campers to make reservations without knowing much about what they’re getting.
Sure, you can consult Internet RV campground reviews to get a clearer picture of what to expect. But these reviews are subjective and full of personal bias. The Wilkes private RV camping directories offer a distinctly different perspective than any other resource. Readers enjoy a solidly objective review of potential campgrounds as well as an in-depth critique of each campsite at that location. Committing to a reservation has never been easier in the territory they cover.
What’s a “private campsite”?
Campsite #35 at Silver Fork Campground near Kyburz, California. Fits up to a 50-foot motorhome.
Just like the Wilkes’ first book, “Eastern Sierra and Death Valley Camping with Privacy,� this latest guide fills in the gaps of campground directories on the Internet. Instead of just listing whether or not a campground has RV hookups, the Wilkes

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The Scoop on RVing Great Basin National Park

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Weighing the Pros and Cons of Full-time RVing

The pros and cons of full-time RVing are different for everyone. What I might think of as a disadvantage, like lack of kitchen space, you might view as an opportunity to eat out more often. When my husband and I were brand-new full-timers, the pros and cons were about equal. But over time, the cons have almost disappeared. Partly because we got used to the lifestyle, but also because we learned to view the cons as growth opportunities. Twelve years into this adventure, here’s how we did it.

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Free Overnight RV Parking Rule 1

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Learn Overlanding Basics and Beyond at The Overland Rallies

Tent camping and RVing may seem like worlds apart. But if you know overlanding basics, you can enjoy the best of both worlds. The Overland Rallies in Washington, British Columbia and Colorado are a great way to get started.
Blending the Best of Tenting with RVing in the Outback
Four wheel drive camper vans are popular overlanding vehicles.
My husband and I assumed our wilderness adventures were over when we traded our trusty backpacks for a comfy RV. Little did we know that we could enjoy the best of solitary wilderness, with comfortable camping in the outback. The rugged four-wheel drive home on wheels style known as an “overlander” is how we’ll get there.
Some overland vehicles carry all the toys.
Overlanding is about going beyond the confines of a predictable campground. According to OutdoorX4 magazine, the definition of overlanding is as follows:
Think of overland travel as blending a road trip with backpacking: traveling that is as much about the journey as it is the destination, and for which the traveler is wholly self-sufficient and capable of overcoming all expected, reasonable challenges that may arise while exploring remote backcountry areas.
A variety of vehicles can be used to support overland travel including dual-sport motorcycles, unmodified all-wheel drive vehicles, 4WD “adventure� vans, trucks, SUVs, and even modified, medium-duty platforms.
Learning Overlanding Basics and Beyond
The Overland Rallies teach backcountry travel skills.
The Overland Rallies are action-packed, hands-on outdoor classrooms. According to overlanding fans, the vibe is far more intimate and less intimidating than the massive, twice-yearly Overland Expo production in Arizona and North Carolina.
AT Overland founder Mario Donovan teaches rig building considerations.
British Columbia, Washington State and now Western Colorado host the rallies each summer. They’re a must-do destination if you have an interest in rugged, off-pavement adventures far from the predictability of RV parks and campgrounds. Every event is a

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What I Learned About The Overland Life at #RMOR

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How to Get a National Park Camp Host Job

The National Park camp host is a welcome sight after a long journey. That friendly nod and recognizable ranger-esque uniform instantly brings a sense of comfort and familiarity in unfamiliar, wild places. As a full-time RVer, I’ve often wondered how to get a national park camp host job. While visiting Nevada’s Great Basin National Park, a friendly park ranger explained how.
What Do Workampers Do?
A National Park Camp Host in Big Bend, Texas. Image: LiveWorkDream.com
Workamping is one way of lowing your travel costs when RVing across the country. A typical workamping position consists of an arrangement between an employer (or organization like the National Park Service) and an RVer with a self-contained rig.
The workamper will put in a pre-determined number of hours each week at the employer’s establishment. In return, he or she receives free or discounted RV parking. Sometimes an hourly wage is paid for every hour worked, but not always. The workamper may also receive non-monetary compensation, like free propane and use of guest facilities. The workamping risks and rewards are many, and vary from job to job.
Call me biased, but I believe that life as a camp host is a far more rewarding experience than working in a private RV park. Each day these volunteer heroes take some of the pressure off park rangers. From their temporary home in a beautiful national park campground, camp hosts tackle daily duties such as:

Directing road-weary guests to open campsites
Educating visitors about their environment
Sharing tips for local attractions
Tidying up campsites
Cleaning facilities

Here’s a more detailed camp host job description from Volunteer.gov, the clearinghouse for public lands volunteer opportunities:
Typical camp host duties at National Parks in the U.S.
A National Park camp host job isn’t always perfect, however. While private RV parks will almost always provide full-hookups for the workamper, a national park camp host campsite

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Exploring the Overlanding Nomad Life at #RMOR

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Why We Do What We Do

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Three Great East Coast Trails Near RV Parks

The Eastern Seaboard is a busy place. Finding solitude can be a challenge when you’re RVing among the 117 million residents who live in Atlantic Coast states. But getting away from crowds isn’t totally impossible. A number of great East Coast RV trails near RV parks can be your setting for a perfect rural or urban retreat into nature.
Three Great East Coast Trails Near RV Parks for Easy Access
Whether you have one weekend, one week or longer for your RV getaway, you’ll love the convenience of not having to drive to famous multi-use trails right outside your doorstep. The East Coast has many great trails near RV parks, and here are three with the most well-known scenery and amenities.
MAINE: The Eastern Trail in Sacco
Sunrise on the Eastern Trail near Portland. Image: Corey Templeton, Flickr.
Tourists flock to the coastal town of Sacco, Maine, for the town’s beaches and amusement parks. But many also visit this historic community because of its proximity to the Eastern Trail.
The 28.9-mile-long multi-use path connects Portland to Kennebunk along old The Eastern Railroad Line, the first connecting Boston to Portland until it was decommissioned in 1945. Walk, run or bike along the flat coastal route that traverses through country roads, tidal wetlands and on urban neighborhood streets.
Most of the Eastern Trail is off-road but two small sections are on well-marked city streets. Fundraising campaigns are underway to take the entire trail off-road.
The closest RV campground near an Eastern Trail entrance is the Sacco / Old Orchard Beach KOA. This busy RV park is spacious, level, pet-friendly and less than a half mile away from the actual trailhead.
VIRGINIA: Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail 
A bridge crosses a river along the Virginia Creeper Trail, a 34-mile bicycling, jogging, and walking trail along an old railroad line from Abingdon through Damascus

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